LiveWire Network Peer Answers Peer Support Teen Forums Tech Forums College Forums 308 users online 275439 members 47 active today Advertise Here Sign In
TeenCollegeTechPhotos | Quizzes | LiveSecret | Memberlist | Dictionary | FAQ
You have 1 new message.
Emergency Help
Until you sign up you can't do much. Yes, it's free.

Sign Up Now
Membername:
Password:
Already have an account?
Invite Friends
Active Members
Groups
Contests
Moderators
0 online / 0 MPM
Fresh Topics
  LiveWire / My Forums / Prof Reviews / Music / Detail

 (+) Add Review
Thompson, Lee
Music
Average Rating: 8.0
Reviews
Posted Jan. 4, 2007 at 6:37pm
Teaching Style: Mainly Lecture
Grading: Hard
Availability Outside Class: Good
Homework Load: Average
Medieval-Rennaissance Music History

Overall Rating: 7.0

Recommended
Comments:
I'm not going to repeat what the other reviews have said--they're pretty comprehensive. I will say that Dr. T. is really fun and interesting and I enjoyed his class, but he is sometimes disorganized and he puts unpredictable tid-bits on tests. This is more annoying than it is difficult--overall, you will learn a lot if you take this class and you'll do okay if you work at it.
Posted April 14, 2005 at 7:45pm
Teaching Style: Mainly Lecture
Grading: Hard
Availability Outside Class: Average
Homework Load: High
Music History Medieval to 1700

Overall Rating: 8.0

Recommended
Comments:
Oh, what can I say. I love Dr. Thompson and will forever cherish fond memories of this class. He is a very tough grader, though, and the listening quizzes, like the previous review says, "pretty much suck." The tests are hard, too--the second one was awful--but if you study hard, come to class, and do the listening, you'll be fine. HAM forever!
Posted Feb. 9, 2005 at 7:40pm
Teaching Style: Mixture
Grading: Hard
Availability Outside Class: Good
Homework Load: High
Music 397, Medieval - 1700

Overall Rating: 9.0

Recommended
Comments:
I am a music minor and took this class as my first music history class. The previous review is very consistent with my own thought. Dr. Thompson knows his stuff and sets high expectations. Definitely do the reading, and prepare early in the week for hte weekly listening exams. The early listening exams are fairly easy, but it gets progressively harder, and pretty much sucks. To do well on the exams, you have to be good at memorization, as that is pretty much what this class is about. But after the course is over, you will know much more than you ever imagined. I highly recommend Dr. Thompson. He was willing to meet with me at any time and wouldn't be satisfied until I had all of my questons answered.
Posted Jan. 31, 2005 at 9:31pm
Teaching Style: Mainly Lecture
Grading: Hard
Availability Outside Class: Average
Homework Load: High
Music 397 Music History Medieval-1700

Overall Rating: 8.0

Recommended
Comments:
Music History Medieval-1700 covers an extensive body of work. From reading about the earliest examples of Western music, to getting to hear and understand the development of chant, to the birth of polyphony, instrumental music and opera on into the Baroque period the class will cover a lot territory. It should be noted that the vast majority of the music is vocal rather than instrumental and that instrumental music will not really be covered until the latter sections of the class. Many of the earlier pieces have an unknown composer but later notables covered include Josquin, Palestrina, Marenzio and Vivaldi.

Dr. Thompson is very well organized, a strong lecturer and both fair and demanding. Doing well in his Music History Medieval-1700 class is a real accomplishment but the criteria for doing so are always easily understood. Your grade is almost entirely based on listening quizzes (weekly) and exams (of which there are three, including the "final"). Each of the three exams covers the material from the last exam onward. In other words, no exam is cumulative.

Time commitments for the class are fairly extensive. Though the assigned reading is not neccesarily essential (no matter what he tells you) it can still be helpful. On the other hand, all but the most adept listeners will need to spend significant time preparing for the weekly listening quizzes. You will be given a syllabus with a list of works that you should familiarize yourself with, divided up into the listening quizzes you should know them for (as well as the exams that will re-test you on them in addition to other material). Though the amount varies from week to week, the format is consistent: know the composer, name of the work and movement of the work you are listening to if the work is in multiple parts.Every Friday he will play anywhere from a couple excerpts to as many as 7, with the excerpts averaging about 30 seconds in length.

Every quiz averages 6-11 points and every exam is about 100 points. In addition to one other assingment (a very short notation project assigned within the first few weeks of class) these will be the only points you can get in the class. There is no extra credit.

Exams will include many, but not neccesarily all, of the following:
1) Listening. This section is identical to the listening quizzes but with more material to draw upon and with more examples.
2) Score identification. You will be expected to grow familiar the visual layout of the types of music you are listening to. These score IDs require you to identify musical traits, guess the period that the works was written in, guess a potential composer and guess where the work was written. A background in music theory is VERY helpful in these sections but students have been known to do well without it .
3) Matching terms. In these section you will be given a series of terms and a larger list of definitions and asked to match the correct definition to each term. For example the term "monophony" will match up to the definition "one unencumbered melodic line".
4) Essays or outlines. Dr. Thompson will usually give you two possibilities in this section. Sometimes you'll be able from two essay prompts, sometimes two outlines, sometimes two essays or two outlines, etc. etc. The sections are graded fairly and Dr. Thompson will sometimes hint at potential topics before an exam. He is not a stickler for proper grammar but he really appreciates correct spelling. Whether you are dealing with essays or outlines the prompts will usually call for the use of dates, times and names of composers and most importantly for the use of musical examples to support your point. Sometimes this doesn't just mean knowing the names of works but also calls for information about stylistic traits.
Misc.) The above four sections are the bread and butter of the exams but sometimes Dr. Thompson will throw in new types of sections, such as asking the student to notate the second voice in a piece of parallel organum with oblique motion. Don't worry, this is not as difficult as it sounds. Just keep your eye on the often times difficult bread and butter sections of the exam.

The general trend over the last four years or so has been for the 1st exam to be the easiest and the 3rd exam to be significantly harder with the 2nd exam being the hardest by far. It will be interesting to see if this trend continues.

The class is a requirment for Music Majors but I would reccomend that Music Minors opt for either 20th Century or 18th Century since these classes are significantly easier for beginners.

When you finish your class with Dr. Thompson, you will have learned a lot of material quite well. Demanding, but effective, his classes provide a valuable service to the students that are willing to step up to a high level of excellence.